1. Reblogged from: jessicasezz
  2. tls-doomed-delights:

    myheartheartsbooks:

    Hardcovers for aesthetics.
    Paperbacks to read.
    Ebooks to travel.

    The holy trinity of book lovers.

    Reblogged from: halfagony-halfhope
  3. theimpossiblecool:

“Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still believe it to be a beautiful place.”
Kurt Vonnegut.

    theimpossiblecool:

    “Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still believe it to be a beautiful place.”

    Kurt Vonnegut.

    Reblogged from: theimpossiblecool
  4. Reblogged from: cola-kiss
  5. greaterland:

me as hell

    greaterland:

    me as hell

    Reblogged from: shellingpeasifyouplease
  6. omgthatdress:

Evening Ensemble
Sophie Gimbel, 1962
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    omgthatdress:

    Evening Ensemble

    Sophie Gimbel, 1962

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Reblogged from: omgthatdress
  7. nubbsgalore:

    leaf senescence begins with the advent of the summer solstice, as the days get shorter and sun becomes more distant. trees begin to reduce the production of chlorophyll — a green pigment critical to photosynthesis — and eventually begin to break down that which remains in the leaf in order to reabsorb its nitrogen.  

    as the green of leaves consequently begins to fade, other pigments in the leaf — carotenoids and flavonoids — also see reduced production in the leaf, but at a much slower rate than chlorophyll, which enables their yellow and orange colours to be expressed. 

    for some trees, colder temperatures trigger the synthesis of the flavonoid anthocyanin, causing those leaves with lower levels of other flavonoids or carotenoids to turn red. if other pigments are sufficiently present, the colours can blend into auburn.

    it is believed that trees will produce anthocyanin to protect themselves from sap sucking insects that would otherwise be drawn to the yellow and orange colours of their leaves. 

    eventually, these non chlorophyll pigments fade themselves as the tree, in preparation for winter, denies its leaves water (otherwise transported through some of the veins seen here). in an effort to also retain nutrients, a deciduous tree will then signal the abscission cells at the base of its leaves to swell.

    this not only blocks the flow of nutrients but ultimately causes the leaves to tear away and fall to the ground, where the tree can then reabsorb any leaf nutrients through its roots before going into winter dormancy.  

    photos by (click pic) avi dvilansky, zoomboy1 x, bryan hoynemark johnsonjaqueline d’ellatorsten silz, justin schmauser, anymotion, photoholic1 and joan rankin hayes.

    Reblogged from: shellingpeasifyouplease
  8. Reblogged from: marykatewiles
  9. Reblogged from: halfagony-halfhope
  10. disney-park-junkie:

     Leota Toombs was an Imagineer and is also the face of both Madame Leota and Little Leota, at the Haunted Mansion attractions in Disneyland, WDW, and Tokyo Disneyland parks.

    Only her face was used for Madame Leota, the voice is that of Eleanor Audley. You will probably remember her best for her voice acting as Lady Tremaine and Maleficent . Leota’s actual voice can be heard calling out to exiting guests, “Hurry back! Hurry Back!”. 

    Reblogged from: disneyhips
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